Philadelphia Is Doing Something About Our Sugar “Love Affair” According To Philly Lawyer Karl Heideck

     According to the USDA, the average American consumes between 150 and 170 pounds of sugar a year. Thirteen percent of the total adult caloric intake between 2005 and 2010 was from sugar calories. Eighty percent of all packaged foods contain sugar. And soda is the leading source of sugar for adults between the ages of 18 and 54. A 20-ounce bottle of soda has more than 17 teaspoons of sugar in the recipe. It’s hard to judge the amount of sugar people eat during the day, but the maximum intake of sugar should be 36 grams for men and 24 grams for women.

Obesity from too much sugar is creating health issues for people of all ages, and little is being done on the federal level to curb this “love affair” with sugar. But one city is doing its part to cut the amount of sugar people put in their bodies each day. Philadelphia put an extra tax on soda at the beginning of 2017. City officials hope the 1.5 cents per ounce extra tax will force people to buy drinks that don’t have as much sugar as sodas, according to Jenkintown lawyer, Karl Heideck.

Karl Heideck specializes in risk management review, litigation, and compliance law. He is also well-versed in employment and corporate law. Mr. Heideck got his law degree from Temple University, in 2009, and he did his undergraduate work at Swarthmore College.

Besides practicing law, Karl Heideck is a professional writer. Karl’s legal essays are informative as well as useful. Several websites and blogs publish his work. Plus, Karl Heideck is now a regular contributor to Philly Purge.

According to Karl Heideck, the new Philadelphia soda tax law is controversial. Opponents of the tax say the soda tax hurts local businesses, and it hurts consumers because they pay a double tax. Sugar drinks already have a tax built into the price. Some union leaders say people are losing their jobs because of the new soda tax. But the two rulings in favor of the soda tax by the Pennsylvania Commonwealth Court, and the Philadelphia County Court of Common Pleas confirm the soda tax is legal.

For more, please read https://thereisnoconsensus.com/karl-heideck-explains-effects-philadelphia-soda-tax/.